Displaying items by tag: tlc

So what do we ask for at Year End?

By Kirk Walden, Advancement SpecialistYearEnd3

For many ministries, Year End also means the end of the budget year. If we are trying to catch up on the budget at this time, we need to be careful in our appeal.

Our friends do not want to hear—every year—that we are behind. If we stay on this road year after year, our readers are going to question our stewardship.

Instead, let’s look at some items—which are likely in our budget—that might make for good Year-End Appeals.

 

Catching up on the budget

Didn’t we just say to be careful about this? We did, so here is how to be careful. Take the ministry that needs $15,000 in new funds in order to finish the year in the black.

Instead of talking about how behind we are in the budget, why not say something like this: “$25,000 for First Choice at Year End will not only finish our 2014 on a strong note, these funds will also launch us into a successful 2015, when we plan to . . .”

See the difference? The budget shortfall may be $15,000, but our letter is looking beyond ‘14 and into ‘15, with a positive outlook

Fatherhood Initiatives

Thinking of hiring a person to run your Fatherhood initiative? Factor in not only salary, but all materials, the cost of heating and cooling office space, etc. Roll it into one number and ask—not for simply a new person, but for a fully staffed Fatherhood Initiative.

Marketing

Advertising and marketing is expensive; and some of our constituents don’t understand our need to advertise, making this ask more difficult. Phrasing matters. How about, “In order to best connect with those who need us, we must have a powerful online presence, and we need to be wherever they go. To make this connection through television, radio, the web and social media, we plan to invest $22,500 in 2015. The result, we believe, will be as many as 175 saved lives.”

Brick and mortar

No doubt, renovations and any building projects are effective asks. If we connect our renovations to reaching clients more effectively and saving more lives (and changing lives!), our odds of success grow.

Medical conversion

If we are considering a conversion in the next year, there is every reason to be asking now. There is no reason to wait—year end is a great time to start the process.

Click here for more of this month's Advancement TLC.

#Giving Tuesday: An Online Opportunity

By Kirk Walden, Advancement SpecialistGivingTuesday

We all know Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving. And yes, how can we forget Cyber Monday, when all of the online retailers rally for our attention?

The newest of them all is Giving Tuesday (represented online as #GivingTuesday), begun in 2012 and now catching on across America and in many nations around the world.

Launched by groups from Google to the United Nations, #GivingTuesday is a day to remember charitable giving—and we don’t need to miss out. Here are several ideas to place your ministry at the forefront:

Make sure your online site is ready

Update your giving site to remind readers of #GivingTuesday. The actual date is December 2; this should be prominent as this day approaches.

Set a Goal

If your center has not emphasized #Giving Tuesday in its first two years, a modest goal would be sufficient. In the goal, show exactly where funds would be directed and connect the goal to client outcomes. This is not the time to ask for a computer or materials: “On Giving Tuesday, help us raise $2500. Every dollar given online on Giving Tuesday goes directly toward our Operation Ultrasound Initiative, paying for 25 ultrasounds that will bond women and men with their children, saving lives and changing the lives of moms and dads.”

Remind, remind, remind

In the weeks leading up to #GivingTuesday, remind your constituency through E-Blasts, Twitter, Facebook and other social media. Make sure it is announced wherever you can. 

One Takeaway . . .

#GivingTuesday does not replace your Year End Appeal. There is room for both in your development plan.

Click here for more of this month's Advancement TLC.

CEO Commentary: Check your mailbox . . . It's coming

Writing1The following is a commentary for the CEO or Director of Advancement to include in an E-Blast, Newsletter or other communication. Use as you wish—no credit is due to LifeTrends or Heartbeat International. This is for you to spark ideas, or use “as is.”

It is the time of year when charities and ministries all over send us letters, asking us for year-end gifts. And why not? This is the giving season and it only makes sense that non-profit organizations would see this as the perfect time for much-needed gifts.

And, no surprise; you will receive a letter from us as well.

But why? Are we simply wanting to be a part of the giving season? Is this just a time to pad our giving as we move toward 2015? Is this letter just another portion of a fundraising plan? No. Not at all.

While Year-End is a time when we normally ask friends to consider a gift, this is not a normal time in the life of this ministry.

In truth, this is a watershed moment for this ministry, which includes all of us: Prayer Partners, Volunteer Staff, Board Members, Compensated Staff, Financial Partners . . . All of us. This ministry has always been about all of us, working together to create a massive cultural shift in our area—toward life.

Let me share something with you: We are closer now than we have ever been to this cultural shift.

This year’s “Year End Letter” then, is not just another letter for any of us who consider ourselves a part of the First Choice Family. Not at all.

In this letter we will outline where we are going, show us just how close we are to making an incredible new impact on our community, and what it will take in order for this change to take place.

So when you open your mail a few days after Thanksgiving, amidst many other letters you will find one from me.

I trust you will open it. We have a lot to share, and a lot of dreams ready to come true. Give this letter a first look, and a second.

Big things are about to take place—and we are going to be a part of all of them . . . Together.


 By Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Click here for more of this month's Advancement TLC.

Click here to download this CEO Commentary as a word document.

Thank you letter - November 2014

ThankYou1Thank you letters keep you connected to your partners

Each month, Advancement TLC brings you a sample “Thank you note” to send to your supporters. November’s letter is below:

 

Dear Barney & Thelma Lou,

When I think about where this ministry has been and where we are going, I can’t help but be excited.

I’ve shared our vision in newsletters, letters like this one and in churches and around the area. And as you probably know, I’m nothing but optimistic about the future.

But there is something else I’m excited about: The fact that this ministry never was, and never will be, about one person’s ideas or even the thoughts of some select group.

While our board of directors is entrusted with major decisions, the simple truth is that this ministry is about all of us. It is a shared ideal that we can impact our culture toward life and we can do so right here in (name of city or area).

And best of all, we all have the honor of playing a role. Your support—through this and so many other gifts—creates a powerful partnership that says “We are in this together.”

So, thank you—again. Together, we are changing our world here, one life at a time.

Sincerely,

CEO


 By Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Click here for more of this month's Advancement TLC.

Click here to download this thank you letter as a word document.

Our work: What's love got to do with it?

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Love1When we look at the ministry of development we are taught time and again that we are to see those who support us financially not simply as donors but as financial partners. This is true. We are in fact, to truly love those who choose to make our ministry or organization a financial priority in their lives.

This month then, let's ask a pertinent question that is bigger than capital campaigns, major donor development, or creating a perfect event.

In addition, let's consider a question larger than all of the words we use to describe development, such as "friend raising," and "building partnerships."

The question is a simple one for those of us in development: "What's love got to do with it?"

 

If we answer this question well, we will transform our fundraising initiatives. The reasons, just like the question above, are simple:

First, love is the key component to any strong relationship. Whether that relationship is a spouse, a good friend or a family member, love creates the foundation that takes a relationship through trials and struggles. And, love makes the good times even better.

Second, love shifts our focus away from "getting funds" and toward building an unshakeable foundation based on building these relationships. As we build relationships the funds will generally follow. And even if funds may not follow in some instances, we know our ministry is in the middle of God's will. Why?
Those development plans built on relationships are focused on eternal, not temporal, treasures. If we are always looking to the eternal, we never have to doubt whether we are in God's will. With that confidence, we will be less concerned when funding doesn't seem to be as strong.

So what does love have to do with our development plan? Everything. This month, let's consider what love looks like as we build relationships with those who support us.

Those on our support team are actually our volunteers, our heartbeat . . . And our brothers and sisters. Let's love them as we would ourselves.

 

Click here for more of this month's TLC.

 

Viewing our donors as our family

Commentary with Kirk

Viewing our donors as our familyConnect1

Often, because our donors are on the other side of a check or a bank draft—and many times we do not actually see them, it is hard to gain perspective on these friends of the ministry.

Yes, we see them at banquets, other events, in the store or when we present our vision at a church. But if we were to sit down and add up all of our donors, how many do we get to talk to, face-to-face, in the course of a year? What's the number for us? Is it 10%? 20%? As much as 25%? I don't have a formula in mind here; but this brings out the fact that our mind set is important.

Because it is harder to connect with those who support us financially, we must have a mindset that keeps these very important people at the forefront of our thought processes.

Here are a few thoughts to consider:

Our financial supporters are volunteers for us, too

Many of us give gifts to our volunteers each year. Perhaps we have a volunteer appreciation event. We recognize our volunteers at our fundraising dinners. We recognize them in a special way on anniversaries (5 years, 10 years, etc.). This is all important to building a family culture among those who take the time to serve in our ministries.

And yet, almost all of our financial partners are doing something quite similar in order to support us. Those who are giving $50 per month may be volunteering two hours or more of their time (before taxes!) in order to give that gift. Some are sacrificing entertainment dollars for us. Others may be setting aside a night out with the family—for our ministry.

These too, in every sense of the word, are volunteers.

Does this mean we publicly recognize these people as volunteers? Not exactly. But it does mean that there can be a place for us to thank our financial supporters with the same heart in which we thank our volunteers. We will tackle the "Gift Question" on the following page, but for now let's keep in mind that seeing our donors as volunteers begins to shift our perspective.

We see volunteers as investing their talents in our ministry. So do financial supporters—just in a different way. The engineer, the construction worker, the doctor, the secretary, the teacher, the sales representative—all of these who are giving their funds are using their talents . . . For the betterment of our ministry.

In addition, we see volunteers as taking time out of their day to commit to our mission. The same dynamic takes place with our financial supporters. But what about the retired? And those on fixed incomes? These too, are volunteers. Their hard work over many years has paid off, and they are sharing the fruits of their past labors with us.

Volunteers then, aren't just in our offices. They are all over our community, working for us.

 Click here for more of this month's TLC.

Paul gives us a clear perspective (on raising funds!)

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Paul1

Raising funds is a challenge, certainly. Yet sometimes it is our perspective that creates its own challenges.

When funds are tight, it is easy for us to focus on what we don't have, and how to make our case known so we can get back to a financially-sound situation. It's natural for us, when things are tight, to be thinking of ways to try harder, to create new opportunities for gifts, etc.

The Apostle Paul was no stranger to tight situations, whether it be persecution, church turmoil, or finances. He also asked for gifts; making him—in our vernacular—a development director for the work of the fledgling church. If we don't believe this, all we have to do is read II Corinthians 8 and 9, two chapters where Paul lays out a plan for specific giving.

We can learn from Paul, primarily through his perspective. Read with me Philippians 4:16-17: "for even in Thessalonica you sent a gift more than once for my needs. Not that I seek the gift itself, but I seek for the profit which increases to your account."

Read that again. What does Paul actually want? "The profit which increases to your account." If we want a reason to look to Paul as our expert in fundraising, this is it. Paul is not interested in his own comfort, and while he knows his mission is to advance the power of the Gospel message, he sees another priority: Giving opportunity to build the faith and the resulting growth in the spiritual account of those who give.

If we are involved in development, these two verses should sit on our desk and be a focal point of our thinking, every single day. For if our perspective is to see our financial partners' "accounts" grow (instead of first focusing on our financial accounts), everything changes.

We will be:
• More attuned to our donors' spiritual needs
• More interested in seeing their spiritual growth through giving
• More willing to listen to their desires for our ministries
• Less worried about our ministry's financial situation
• Less likely to give in to gimmicks in order to raise funds

Paul had it right, didn't he? That's why Phil. 4:16-17 is not simply a couple of nice verses to chat about during a workshop. It is instead a state of mind that zeroes in on the real reason for giving. Giving will fund our ministries, yes. But God is not simply interested in getting people to give to us so that our organization can do more.

No, God wants to build the faith and the spiritual "accounts" of those who love him. We are being used by God to bring this to fruition. This was Paul's perspective. It can be ours, too.

Click here for more of this month's TLC.

 

A Director of Advancement matters, a lot

by Kirk Walden, Advancement SpecialistadvancementDirector1


When we think of a Director of Development or a Director of Advancement, we often think of someone whose sole job it is to build the ministry's funding base.

There is truth in this, but let's add a caution which may blow our socks off: It's not about the money.

In a sense, it is about money and we may grade job performance partially on funds raised. And, we can make the point that adding this position should result in more funds raised. So partially at least, money is an issue.

But, the Director of Advancement is primarily a person who should be involved in creating relationships with those who give to the ministry. As an off-shoot of these relationships more funds may certainly come in; but at its foundation, the Director of Advancement is not . . . About the money.

For those ministries trying to make a case for this position, let's offer this: In most pregnancy help organizations there is a Director of Client Services, or perhaps a Center Director. This person may work closely with volunteers; setting up trainings, recruiting and building relationships with volunteers. She is often the go-to person for volunteers.

If we truly believe that our financial supporters volunteer for us, we now have a great reason to employ a Director of Advancement. We need someone who will not only work on our events, but who will make it a year-round endeavor to build relationships with all who support the ministry.

Usually, the CEO forms close relationships with those who give major gifts; but what about those who give $25 per month? $50 per month? How much time does the CEO have if the number of people giving monthly swells to 100, 200 or 500?

Let's keep in mind that those giving monthly today may be the very people who can fund a capital campaign tomorrow. By building these relationships now—and making these true relationships—asking these friends to help with major gifts tomorrow becomes much more natural, and easier.

But we need a person who has the time to make building these relationships a priority. That person is not the CEO, who is working with the board, personnel issues, making presentations and more (oh, and who should be building relationships with many donors already). No, we need someone else, whose job is solely to connect our friends to the ministry.

The primary job of our Director of Advancement is not money, not at all. It is relationships. When our Director of Advancement is actively building relationships in the community, that's building love and camaraderie. And yes, our funding will grow as well.

 Click here for more of this month's TLC.

Gifts or Incentives? The Conundrum with our Donors

 

To gift or not to gift? That is the question we face with our donors.

 

Do we send a gift when a financial supporter reaches a certain "tier" in their giving? Do we offer gifts for an amount given? To get the answer, let's first define what a Gift actually is.

The Gift

A gift is given freely, either as a way of saying "thank you" or simply because. There are no strings, no expectations.

An Incentive

This is where we get mixed up. When a ministry offers a free book for a gift of $100 or more, it is not a gift. Because there is a prerequisite involved (giving the ministry financial support of a certain value) this is no longer a gift but an incentive.

Let's stop here, because it is important to note that incentives are not bad or wrong. I remember giving a gift to a major ministry, and I raised my amount because I could receive a print of a painting in return for that gift. Instead of buying the print, I gave the gift. So this clarification is not to say that incentives are somehow unchristian.

But they are what they are: Incentives. This is a different discussion for another article, certainly. But a gift is freely given.

Should we give gifts?

Answering a question with a question, "Do we give gifts to our friends? To our family members? To those who have helped us in some way?" I would think the answer is . . . Yes.

Our financial supporters should be our friends. We should always be in process of building relationships (friendships!) with them. It might naturally follow that gifts could be a part of this. Not in every case, but at times a well thought-out gift may be extremely appropriate.

Some supporters will eschew gifts ("Don't spend the ministry's money on a gift for me") so it may be important for the board to set up a separate fund, perhaps funded by ministry board and staff, for these gifts. When a donor, concerned that ministry funds be designated for clients, raises an objection, we can answer with, "You can be assured that we did not use ministry-designated funds for this; this is simply a gift, nothing more and nothing less."

Quick take . . .

A gift is welcome, when it is heartfelt. And a gift is quite different from an incentive, in that incentives are designed to draw in certain donations; gifts are designed to build donor relationships. We can invest in both; but must know the difference.

Click here for more of this month's TLC.

 

Thank you letter - October 2014

Thank you letters keep you connected to your partners

Each month, The LifeTrends Connection brings you a sample "Thank you note" to send to your supporters. October's letter is below:

Dear George and Laura,

The Apostle Paul, closing his letter to the Philippians, noted that while no other church assisted him with a financial gift, his friends in Philippi had.

Paul noted that they sent "a gift more than once for my needs," then makes an interesting statement: "Not that I seek the gift itself, but I seek for the profit which increases to your account."

This is a statement we can "bank on," a reminder that all of our gifts bring profit to an account we cannot see our touch. It is an eternal account, one that will always grow.

Your gift brings profit to your account, and we are ever mindful of this. And yet, here on Earth, we are thankful because your gift is being invested in changing lives, and saving lives—another way your gift is bringing profit every day.

Thank you. We appreciate your investment in this work. Every day, we are seeing the fruits of your investment. And I believe one day, we will see even more.

Sincerely,

 

CEO

 Click here for more of this month's TLC.

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