Displaying items by tag: tlcDec14

The Case for Support: Hardly a "Boring" Document!

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialistbored baby

Tweet this! When I think of what we call a "Case for Support" I yawn just uttering the words.

When I think of what we call a "Case for Support" I yawn just uttering the words. Couldn't we have come up with a better name for the very document that should convince our friends to join us in a mighty endeavor that could literally change history?

If you are wondering, a Case for Support, by definition, is a document whereby a ministry gives a "case" for why a particular initiative, or the ministry in general, deserves financial backing from a particular person, or the community at large.

But I'm going to be direct here: The terminology is boring.

Consider, if your ministry has a bold initiative that will save lives and change lives forever . . . This initiative—whatever it is—will change the course of history. Really! (And you need to know, I rarely use exclamation points. For this however, I make an exception. So there.)

Sadly, unless we want to recreate fundraising and development terminology, we're stuck with the dry, "Case for Support." What we can do however, is give the document itself some pop, some excitement. When we do, those who are thinking about joining our financial team will notice. We will build stronger relationships, and those we serve will be the ultimate beneficiaries of new financial gifts.

This month's issue then, is about ways we can give this document something extra, and why. In addition, let's look at some new recipients for this document. We might find that the Case for Support (CFS) can make all the difference in an exciting development plan for our ministry.


 

Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

Our CFS is a Big Deal: A Q & A

by Kirk Walden, Advancement SpecialistQA

Our Case for Support can be a huge boost to our development plan, if we maximize its potential for reaching our financial friends in the ministry. Let's take a look at some questions that will help us identify an effective CFS and how it can make a difference for us in 2015:

What is a Case for Support (CFS), and why do we need one?
By definition, a CFS is a document outlining the reasons why your ministry is important and lays out a plan for the future and/or a specific initiative which needs funding. In most cases, a CFS contains an individual ask for funding the organization or the initiative.

It is a smart idea for every organization to create a CFS whenever a major new initiative is rolled out ("Major" might mean an initiative with a price tag of $25,000 or more), or each year—as a way of sharing with its supporters the plans for the coming 12 months.

How many pages is a typical CFS?
We will look at the key elements in another article ("Core Elements of a Winning CFS"), but this document will likely end up with anywhere from 8-12 pages. Keep in mind, every element needs to be concise. We need plenty of white space in our CFS, to give our friends a chance to glance. We don't want to take them on a literary journey.

Who should receive a copy of our CFS?
If our CFS is primarily referencing a major initiative (expanding our medical ministry, renovations, the purchase of a new property, etc.), the CFS goes primarily to those who can give larger gifts (of $500 or more).

If our CFS is designed to put forth our annual plan, we will not only place it in the hands of major supporters, but we should strongly consider sending it to our monthly supporters, too. The cost is just a few dollars to send this to our monthly supporters but, with a strong thank you letter inside the front cover, it is a strong investment in building a long-term relationship (See our "CFS Thank You Letter" in this issue).


Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

Two Quick Keys to a CFS that Captures Attention

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialistquick tip

What's our most important goal for our Case for Support (CFS)? Getting people to read it.

Like our newsletter or E-blasts, if no one reads these documents, the news we want to disseminate goes nowhere. What are some characteristics then, of a CFS which garners attention and readership?

Concise articles

As an example, every CFS should contain a "History" page that walks readers through where the ministry has been. Use creative writing sparingly; use bullet points often. Consider two examples:

The AAA Pregnancy Center started in 1984, in the living room at the home of Bill and Mary Jones. There, a prayer group began gathering, praying about a way to address the abortion issue in a Christian fashion. At the meeting were 12 interested people, though more wanted to come. Two weeks later all would meet again and begin planning to create a ministry and obtain 501c3 status for our organization.

Or this:
June 4, 1984—AAA Pregnancy Center's history begins with a meeting of 12 friends at the home of Bill and Mary Jones in Leighton Valley.

May 14, 1985—Our first client arrives on opening day at our first location: 284 Elm Street in Leighton Valley.

March 12, 1986—It's a boy! Jacob is the first child born to a AAA client. Today he is 27 years old; he and his wife have two children of their own.

January 9, 1989—AAA moves into a new home on Main Street. This location would serve us for 19 years.

In the first example, we see a paragraph with mostly superfluous information. The reader is already tired, and likely will not move on to further information on our History page.

In the second, we use almost the same number of words to communicate four milestones. With a bit of detective work, we might find fascinating information that will encourage and bring life to the entire ministry.

Photos

As a writer this is hard to admit, but our readers are drawn more to our photos than to our stunning prose. Those who support us want to see what we are doing, and photos are an excellent way to tell our story. We don't need professional photographers (though this would be great). We do need photos—that tell a story.

Tweet this! It is often more effective to show one client hugging her baby than it is to show fifty clients in a group photo.

It is often more effective to show one client hugging her baby than it is to show fifty clients in a group photo. The photo of one client tells a story; fifty faces is just another group shot.

In addition, use photography to highlight new initiatives, such as construction and renovation. Architectural drawings of new construction can be helpful, too.


 Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

 

Core Elements of a Winning CFS

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialistchecklist

What goes inside a Case for Support? You can add more than the following, but here is a good start:

Cover Letter
Personalize a letter to the recipient, thanking your financial partner for reading, briefly outlining the reason for the CFS and giving a short overview of the projects or initiatives inside. This letter is less than a page. Say thanks, tell 'em why, and tell 'em how. That's it.

History
A brief, bulleted list of milestones, recognitions and key staff changes ("Myra Jones joined the PRC as CEO, beginning a 12-year tenure that would bring our ministry into the medical realm").

Where we are
Let your friends know what you are accomplishing today. Make sure results are measurable. Our readers will pick up on attempts to be vague in our assessments. Consider two sentences; which is more effective in telling our story?:

One attempt: "We are seeing a lot of clients and they are telling us how much they appreciate what we do for them!"

Or, "A whopping 87% of our clients say they would recommend us to friends. In addition, a documented 83% of those who come to us considering ending their pregnancies ultimately choose life for their children."

A clear picture of why we are asking
Whether the CFS is for a specific initiative or for overall funding, create a clear image for readers of the ministry's needs. "We need more funding for advertising" is not clear.

Instead, try, "Our Outreach Initiative includes $14,400 for a more powerful web presence, $5,845 for signage on our city's main artery, Highway 000, and $4,200 for TV ads on several cable channels that reach our main demographic of 18-24 year old women." Your plan can include even more details, but you see the point.

Give actual numbers. Providing details (keep it concise, but details matter) shows good stewardship and careful planning. Both of these characteristics connect positively with those who can give to you.

A clear appeal
Except for those times when a CFS is sent as purely an informational piece for current donors, Ask. People are always more likely to give when asked. Best-selling author Nora Roberts has some words of wisdom here: "If you don't ask, the answer is always No."

Ways to Give
Tweet this! When it comes to clarity, "Ways to Give" must be at the top of our list.
When it comes to clarity, "Ways to Give" must be at the top of our list. No ask is complete without the "How" portion, and Ways to Give shows our friends specific opportunities to support the ministry.

Here are a few to keep in mind:

One Time Gift—Make sure a return envelope and response device are included with your CFS. Make sure online giving is presented, with your donation site prominently shown. Then check the web site and attempt to make a gift online. Experience it yourself and make sure it is easy.

Monthly Giving—Provide an opportunity to make a monthly (open-ended; not for just one year) commitment. Present this on your web site as well.

Stock Gifts—Explain how to make a stock gift. For more information on this, search the subject online. You will find verbiage and information from universities and major non-profits.

Gifts of Property—Why not present this option as well? Write, "If you would like to make a gift of property to (name of ministry) email Jane Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call her (000-0000) for more information." The more opportunities we present, the better the perception in the donor's mind.

Memorial/Honorarium Gifts—Your response device should present opportunities for Memorial Gifts (honoring those who have passed away) and Honorarium Gifts (Honoring those still living). A large percentage of donors utilize these gift avenues. Let's make them available.


Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

 

Cover Letter for Our Case For Support

Reaching our monthly supporters

Your Case for Support can be sent to your monthly supporters as a way to keep them informed and invested in the ministry. The following is a cover letter to introduce this document to your monthly supporters. This letter is geared toward a 2015 Annual Plan:

Dear Joe and Jane,

Each month you invest in (name of ministry), making you a vital part of our team and a catalyst in our bright future.

Inside this packet is our 2015 Vision, a look at where we have been, where we are and where we are headed in the coming you. We wanted you to have this report so you could see that your investment continues to change the lives of those who come in our door.

Thank you for your belief in the mission of (name of center) and your commitment.

Together we are saving lives, and changing lives every day. It is an honor to serve alongside you in this mighty work!

Sincerely,

CEO                      Board Chair


by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

Click here to download this cover letter as a word document.

Thank you letter - January 2015

Each month, Advancement Trends in the Life Community  brings you a sample "Thank you note" to send to your supporters. January's letter is below:

Dear George and Laura,

As we begin 2015 we do so with an optimism that can only grow in the coming year.

Why? Because I'm seeing a trend in those who come in our door. More than ever, they see that we are a place of safety and of hope.

Those that visit us quickly realize that we can be trusted. We tell the truth, and just as important, we choose to love them without conditions.

As a result, I believe we are going to see more and more of our clients choose life for their children, and make other positive decisions for themselves, too.

Quite honestly, you make this happen. Your financial partnership makes this ministry stronger every day; and even brighter days are ahead.

Sincerely,

CEO


 by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist

Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

Click here to download this thank you letter as a word document.

Stuck? Assistance is Easy to Find

by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialiststuck

Boards of Excellence

For pregnancy help ministry boards, it is easy to get consumed by major obstacles. When we face big challenges however, there is good news: Help is not far away.

Many sister organizations have likely walked in our particular shoes, and once faced the same challenges we are facing.

Tweet this! Often, major hurdles are overcome by capturing the counsel of those who have walked our road before.

Often, major hurdles are overcome by capturing the counsel of those who have walked our road before.

How do we find that help? Here are a few ideas:

Make Connections
As a board, make it a priority to send representatives to conferences and make professional connections with other board members (Note: the 2015 Heartbeat International Conference is April 7-10 in St. Louis, MO). Getting to know other board members in other areas, or across a state, brings more wisdom to the table.

One to Follow, One to Lead
Make it a point to create a close connection with another ministry geographically close by that you believe is on the same journey as yours, but has walked more steps on the path. Perhaps this organization is older; or has a larger client base and/or budget than your own. As questions come up, this ministry may be able to help with answers.

At the same time, offer assistance to a nearby ministry wanting to get to where you are. Be a sounding board.

As board chairmen reach out to each other in these ways, we all grow.

Check in with Your Affiliate Network
Whether statewide or nationally, your affiliate network may have answers for you. Utilize its expertise and its connections to dozens, hundreds or thousands of ministries when you're "stuck." For instance, Heartbeat International fields questions daily from its more than 1900 affiliates around the world.

Stuck? Whether the issue be fundraising, staffing or a new initiative that doesn't seem to be getting off the ground, help is on the way. All a board needs to do is access the assistance and counsel already in place.


 

Click here for more of this month's Advancement Trends in the Life Community.

Jesus is Working—and That's the Real Story

But he answered them, 'My father is working until now, and I myself am working." John 5:17Working

We know the story of the healing at Bethesda, a miraculous moment where Jesus comes upon a pool where a sick man is sitting beside the water, hoping for healing.

Jesus asks the man, "Do you wish to get well?" and after the man offers that he is unable to get into what is known as the pool where healings take place, Jesus heals him—no water required!

Imagine the scene for a moment: A man, sick for thirty eight years, finds healing at the hand of one seeking to do nothing more than heal and assist. Can you consider with me how exciting this must have been? Can we see in our minds the people gathering around with joy and astonishment?

And yet, there is more to the story. Suddenly the religious leadership happens on the scene and become "The Sabbath Police." With a miracle in their midst, they complain because in their minds, Jesus chose the "wrong" day (the Sabbath) to do good. If their response was not so arrogant, it would be comical.

Yet toward the end of the story there is a joyous truth we can grasp today. In response to the religious leaders Jesus says, "My father is working until now, and I myself am working." The truth? Jesus is working . . . Now.

Where is it that I need Jesus' work in my life? Where do I need healing, or hope, or courage? For what situations do I need the peace He brings, even when there is tribulation all about me?

Tweet this: Every day, every hour, every moment, Jesus is working on our behalf, as is His Father.

Every day, every hour, every moment, Jesus is working on our behalf, as is His Father.

So take heart. Regardless of the circumstances, and no matter the date, help is on the way. A man sitting by a pool in Bethesda saw this first-hand. We can, too.


by Kirk Walden, Advancement Specialist